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Richard Robert Madden 1798-1886

 

 

 

Edward Madden, a silk manufacturer born November 1739 died 20th November 1830 , 91st year. He was the son of John Madden of Kilternan, county Dublin. Married to an English lady, Miss Lee of Macelesfield

 

 

Edward Madden, was married first circa 1765 to Miss Duras they had ten children

 

 

Married for the second time in 1777 to Miss Elizabeth Forde, youngest daughter of Thaddens Forde, Esq. of Corry, county Leitrim, and Miss Lyons of Lyonstown, county Roscommon. thy had eleven children, Richard Robert Madden was the youngest.

 

 

R. R. Madden, married Harriet Elmslie, daughter of John Elmslie of Berners street, London.

Two sons where born, William Forde (29 March 1848 drowned in the river Shannon age 19), also buried in the Donnybrook Graveyard,  and Thomas More (born Havana, Cuba, 1838- 14 April 1902). (He was injured in a sailing accident, and died the following year at his house in County Wicklow. Wikipedia 28.5.2012).

 

 

 

Danny Parkinson, Donnybrook Graveyard,

and interesting historical facts on Donnybrook and its environs.

Dublin Family History Society, Published June 1993, page 44.

 

Richard Robert Madden,  doctor was converted to homeopathy, traveller, historian and fervent opponent of the slave trade, and historian of the United Irishmen.

 

 

The most famous of the name Madden, was Dr. Richard Robert Madden

Born in Wormwood Gate, Dublin 22 Augustus 1798, died at his home in Booterstown near Dublin city, 5 February 1886.

 

 

 

The house 3 Vernon Terrace, Booterstown Avenue where  Richard Robert Madden died.

I like to thank Davis Neary for the photographs

 

 

He is buried in Donnybrook Cemetery, where also his father and other members of his family found their resting place.

 

 

OF YOUR CHARITY PRAY FOR THE SOUL OF

RICHARD ROBERT MADDEN, M. D. FORMERLY COLONIAL SECRETARY

OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA, A MAN WHO LOVED HIS COUNTRY

AUTHOR OF THE HISTORY OF THE UNITED IRISHMEN AND MANY OTHER WORKS,

REMARKABLE FOR TALENT, PIETY AND RECTITUDE, THE LAST SURVIVING SON OF

EDWARD MADDEN, BORN IN DUBLIN AUGUST 20th 1798. DIED IN BOOTERSTOWN FEB’Y 5TH 1886

AND INTERRED IN DONNYBROOK.

ALSO FOR THE SOUL OF HIS RELICT MRS. HARRIET. T. MADDEN. THE 21ST AND LAST  SURVIVING CHILD OF

JOHN ELMSLIE ESQ. BORN IN LONDON, AUGUST 4TH 1801

CONVERTED BY A SINGULAR GRACE TO THE CATHOLIC FAITH IN CUBA (CIRCA) 1837,

DIED AT BOOTERSTOWN , FEB 7TH 1888.

A WOMAN OF RARE CULTURE, ENDOWMENTS AND PIETY, A GOOD WIFE, A MOST LOVING MOTHER,

EVER RESIGNED TO GOD’S HOLY WILL; CHARITABLE, UNSELFISH, AND GENEROUS.

SHE DEID AS SHE HAD LIVED HER MIND UNCLOUDED, HER LAST BREATH A PRAYER

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AN FOR THE SOUL OF THER LOVED SON, WILLIAM FORDE MADDEN:

WHO WAS DROWED IN THE SHANNON, MARCH, 29TH 1848, IN HIS 19TH YEAR.

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ON WHOSE SOULS SWEET JESUS HAVE MERCY, AMEN

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For your charity – pray for the soul of Richard Robert Madden M.D. formerly Colonial rectitude, Secretary of Western Australia. A man who loved his country. Author of the History of the United Irishmen and many other works remarkable for talent, piety and the  last surviving son of: Edward Madden. Born in Dublin August 20th 1798, died at Booterstown February 5th 1886 and interred in Donnybrook Churchyard. Also for the soul of his relict Mrs. Harriet. T. Madden the last surviving child of John Elmslie Esq. Born in London August 4th 1801. Converted to the Catholic Faith in Cuba (circa) 1837, died at Booterstwn Feb. 7th 1888. A woman of rare culture, endowments and piety, a most loving Mother, and died as she had lived, her mind unclouded, her last breath a prayer.

And for the soul of their beloved son William Ford Madden  – drowned in the Shannon March 29th 1848 in his 19th year.

On whose souls sweet Jesus have mercy, Amen

Also in loving memory of their Grandchildren: William Joseph H. Forde Madden, Born  January 10th 1871 died September 4th 1871 and of Bridget Gertrude Harriet Madden (Beda) a particularly bright and gifted child; born July 17th 1873 died on the 1§th June 1882 in her 7th year.

 

Requiescant in Pace Amen

 

My thanks goes to the valuable help to David Neary

 

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In his book Richard Robert Madden, Travels in Turkey, Egypt, Nubia, and Palestine, in 1824, 1825, 1826, and 1827, in two volumes, Philadelphia 1830.

 

 

In volume II, page 39,  Letter XXVIII to Dr. Richardson, Thebes, Augustus 29, 1826,

 

 

Dear Sir,

 

On the base of one of the colossal statues which bears the name of Memnon, and which is covered with the inscriptions of ancient Greeks, in attestation of the statue’s salutation of the sun,-among the names of the many enlightened travellers of ancient and modern times, who have recorded on that monument their visit to the most celebrated city of all antiquity, I had the pleasure of reading your name, and that of Mr. Salt. In other places I found the names of Bruce, Burckhardt, Belzoni, and many other far-famed individuals; some of them written with a pencil, others scratched with the point of a knife; many, after half a century, are as legible as ever; lightly as they were traced, their characters are uneffaced: but the hands which formed them have long since forgotten their cunning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Robert Madden in oriental costume from volume I

 

 

 

The  graffiti

 

 

 

RDK 1100

 

Dendara, outer hypostyle, column ®, P&M, plan, p. 44

R. MADDEN 1826

 

RDK 553

 

Philae – The Kiosk of Trajan

Inside, wall

MADDEN

 

RDK 439

Elkab – Tomb of Paheri

West wall, south end: The official functions of Paheri

MADDEN 1826

 

RDK 959

Edfu Temple, pylon, entrance, left side

MADDEN date illegible

 

 

RDK 225

 

Medinet Habu Temple, small temple XVIII dynasty, small room

MADDEN 1826

Biographical details

Morris L. Bierbrier, Who was Who in Egyptology, Fourth revised edition, London 2012, p. 348,349; Dedorah Manley and Peta Rée, Henry Salt, London 2001, p. 76 and passim; Deborah Manley, The Nile, 1991, p, 34 and passim; Paul and Janet Starkey, edited, Unfolding the Orient, Reading 2001, p. 75, 76; John O. Udal, The Nile in Darkness, Conquest and Exploration 1504-1862, Norwich 1998, p. 145 and passim;

 

Bibliography

Prince Ibrahim Hilmy, The Literature of Egypt and the Sudan, 1 Volume, Martino Publishing 2001, p. 3; Titus Tobler, Bibliographia Geographica, Palaestinae, Amsterdam 1964, p.150;   Martin R. Kalfatovic, Nile Notes of a Howadji, London 1992, p. 104 (0274); Vivien Igoe, Dublin Burial Grounds & Graveyards, Dublin 2001, p. 90, 91.           

 

 

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MEMOIRS OF DR. R. R. MADDEN,  T. More Madden, 55 Merrion Square, Dublin, 1891

 

CHAPTER XXXIX.
 
DR. MADDEN’S DEATH IN 1886.
 
Dr. Madden peacefully departed this life at his residence, Vernon-terrace, Booterstown, on Friday, 5th of  February 1886. To that inevitable hour he long looked forward with Christian hope and resignation, and in it he was fortified by the ministrations of his Faith. The writer of one of the kindly obituary articles published in the Press at the time of his death well summed up his character as that of — “ An upright, honourable, and high-souled man, whose genial and dignified presence will long be missed. … If not loaded hero with those honours which in any other land might well have rewarded a career so distinguished and so useful to his country and his kind, at least his memory should survive as long as talents of the highest order exercised in the cause of truth and humanity, unswerving rectitude, benevolence, and love of country, deserve our remembrance.” 
His interment, which took place on Tuesday, February 9th, was thus described in another journal of the following day : —  “ Yesterday morning, the remains of Dr. Richard Robert Madden were conveyed from Booterstown for interment in the family burial place at Donnybrook. The greatest marks of respect were shown for the deceased gentleman, and deep sympathy evinced for his widow and family. At Booterstown all the dwellings were closed, and as the funeral cortege, which extended for over a mile along the road, arrived at Donnybrook, the houses had their shutters up. The coffin containing the remains was placed on a catafalque in the Booterstown Church, where Mass was celebrated by the Rev. Pierce Gaussen. C.C., the  Very Rev. Monsignor Farrell, and several other Clergymen assisting at the solemn service, A considerable gathering of leading,’ citizens and representatives of the learned professions were present to pay a tribute of respect to one who filled a foremost place among men of letters of his time, the chief mourners where his son, Dr. T. More Madden, President Obstetric Section Academy of Medicine in Ireland ; his nephew, the Right Hon. William H. F. Cogan, P.O., D.L. ; and his cousin, John C. Murphy, Esq., J. P. On arrival at Donnybrook, the last prayers having been read, the remains of this gifted and estimable man were laid to their rest beside those of his father, mother, and kindred, under the shadow of the now ruined Roman Catholic Church, in which as a boy he had often knelt, and within view of” the ancient residence of “ The Maddens of Donnybrook,” where much of his boyhood was passed. The Christian benevolence of the deceased was unsparingly exercised with equal zeal on behalf of the poor and oppressed, hether they were of his own country or in those distant lands with which his eventful career had brought him in contact ; and during his Colonial Secretary ship in Western Australia this was especially the case. He was one  — “Qui multorum providus urbes et mores hominum inspexit “ ; and in all these wanderings it had ever been his earnest hope that he might ultimately share the resting place of his kindred in the land for which love endured to his heart’s last beat. It is not a little remarkable that the interval between the death of the author of the history of the History of the Lires of the United Irishmen,  who died in his 88th year, and the birth of his father, beside whom he was laid, covers a period of no less than 180 years. The churchyard itself, now close is a burial place, is one of the most ancient in the country. Within its borders lie several eminent worthies, chronicled in Mr. Blacker’s,  Memorials of Booterstown, and amongst these was no truer or more upright man than the venerable Dr. Madden. It may be added that he rests beneath the shade of four cypress trees, which many years ago he had brought from Napoleon’s tomb in far off St. Helena, to mark the site of the Madden family vault, where he desired should be inscribed as his epitaph the words : “ Here also he the remains of a man who loved his country. –“ Requiescat  in pace.’’ 
 
 
CHAPTER XI
 
RETURN TO ENGLAND.- MARIAGE WITH MISS HARRIET ELMSLIE
 
 
Shortly after his return to England, Dr. Madden was married in 1828, at Cheltenham, to Miss Harriet T. Elmslie, youngest daughter of the late John Elmslie, Esq., of Berners-street, London, and owner of Serge Island and other estates in Jamaica.. By a singular coincidence, like her husband, Mrs. Madden was the twenty-first and youngest of her father’s family. This union was the circumstance of all others on which Dr. Madden had reason to congratulate himself throughout the rest of his life, in thus having chosen for his wife a lady of great natural endowments, highly educated and accomplished. These endowments she employed to 
the last hour of existence with untiring zeal and devotion in all the subsequent vicissitudes of life in every quarter of the globe, for the benefit of her husband and of her family. From the time of Dr. Madden’s marriage, there were few pages of his, more than forty volumes, besides the innumerable ephemeral writings which he published, that were not corrected, revised, or transcribed by this intellectual and good wife, and best of mothers. In his labours at home and abroad, in many distant lands where he was engaged in connexion with the abolition of negro slavery and other philanthropic works, she was always his efficient, prudent, and self-sacrificing helpmate and counsellor ; and every trouble, sickness or sorrow, she incessantly strove to solace and comfort others, whilst bearing her own full share of such trials with unmurmuring  resignation. To her courage and presence of mind her husband in
subsequent years owed his life when threatened with assassination on two occasions hereafter to be referred to. It may be added that some years after her marriage Mrs. Madden, when in Cuba in 1837, from sincere conviction — and from a circumstance of a character too solemn to be here referred to, became a convert to the Catholic Faith, into which she was received in the Havanna by a Spanish Franciscan friar, Padre Moreno, a man remarkable for the singular 
piety and self-denial of his life. From that time forth Mrs. Madden was ever a most fervent and exemplary member of the Faith which she had embraced. In the daily practice of its teachings, up to her last moment of existence, she found the best solace for the many trials and bereavements of her life. Always charitable to the poor ; most generous and tolerant to all but herself, as she had hived, so she died, just two years after her husband, the 7th of February 1888, at Vernon –terrace, Booterstown, in the 87th year of her age, her mind unclouded, her last action  an effort to make the sign of redemption, and her last breath a prayer, and was interred in the Madden family grave in the old churchyard of Donnybrook. 
 

 

 

 

Epiloge by David Neary, with sincere thanks!

 

The modern plaque attached to the grave pf Richard Robert Madden, was placed there in 1986 by the National Graves Association and reads as follows:

To the memory of Richard Madden M. D. Irish Historian author and benefactor of Anne Devlin. Erected in the centenary year of his death 1986.

By the National Graves Association Dublin.

 

(Anne Devlin was an Irish patriot who was buried in a pauper’s grave in Glasnevin. Dr. Madden Had her body exhumed and she rests in an honoured place in Glasnevin).

 

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More information on Anne Devlin

 

http://en.wikipedia.ord/wiki/Anne_Devlin

 

 

http://rushlightmagazinearticles.rushlightmagazine.com/

http://www.seares-web.com/devlinI.htmI

 

Vivien Igoe, Dublin Burial Grounds & Graveyards, Dublin 2001, p. 115, 116.

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